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BA (Hons) Design for Branded Spaces is aimed at students who are interested in designing interior, pop up, installation and event spaces for commercial and cultural brands.

For more information: http://www.arts.ac.uk/lcc/courses/undergraduate/ba-hons-design-for-branded-spaces/

It is multidisciplinary and integrates practices from spatial, exhibition, scenographic and interaction disciplines to provide cutting edge experiences for consumers, customers and visitors.

Students on the course apply the latest technologies to the design of interactive and immersive multi-sensory experiences to connect people and brands, and provide solutions to key challenges affecting the future of branded spaces across a range of commercial, retail, workplace, cultural and community environments.
Additional costs: In addition to tuition fees you are very likely to incur additional costs such as travel expenses and the cost of materials. We strongly suggest you read the information on our Additional Costs page.
Open Days
The next Open Day for this course will be held on Saturday 10 December at London College of Communication.

Book your place now

http://www.arts.ac.uk/lcc/courses/undergraduate/ba-hons-design-for-branded-spaces/

BA (Hons) Design for Branded Spaces explores the design of immersive and interactive brand space experiences.
REASONS TO APPLY
The BA (Hons) Design for Branded Spaces is the only course in the UK that integrates the design of physical and visual branded spaces with digital technologies, spatial communication and experiential design, enabling you to create stimulating experiences and innovative brand interactions for customers and visitors of commercial, cultural and non-profit brands.

The course allows you to work on live and experimental briefs in collaboration with high profile experience, spatial and interaction design organisations and designers.
Sensory design and creating atmospheres for experiential environments provides a further focus for the course.

You are immersed in a proactive professional context. Professional branding and marketing approaches within brand value strategic frameworks underpin design practices.

You will actively participate in the development of future branded spaces innovations by using design techniques such as speculative and design fiction to anticipate intelligent ways to develop future scenarios for brands.
The Diploma in Proffesional Studies is available on this course.

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UAL      Writing PAD        HEA

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Screen Writes

A one-day symposium sponsored by LCC, HEA-ADM and the Writing PAD network.

Date: Friday, June 27, 2014   

Start Time: 10.00 am

Location: London College of Communication

Room T304 (Tower Block)

London College of Communication
Elephant & Castle
London SE1 6SB

https://screenwrites2014.wordpress.com/

Background

The ‘Screen Writes’ Symposium to be held on 27 June at LCC will explore the purposes and practices of writing as practice for BA students engaged in visual communication, including graphic design, advertising and animation. The idea of a symposium has sprung from the new ‘writing and blogging’ course for Level 1 students at the London College of Communication (Mark Ingham, with Andrea Mason, Linda Stupart, Andrew Slatter and Harriet Edwards): this will be critically analysed. The emphasis more generally is on writing practices emergent from studio concerns in line with the ethos of the Writing PAD project and its subsequent network. There will be time to discuss and exchange across roles and institutions in this symposium.

The ‘Screen Writes’ symposium is intent on exploring a number of interconnected areas related to graduate attributes.  Firstly, the role of creative writings in relation to voice and identity through the daily and weekly practice of making the student’s writing public using online presences, in this case a practice/theory blog. This allows the students to see writing as going from being a fairly passive, summatively driven activity, to one that is in constant formation.

Secondly, it will explore the inherent mix that writing has with image and graphics in visual communication practices. This includes the surveying of tools and techniques employed when using online presences and how these can be used in such things as peer-to-peer learning. The idea that design and media students are writing with images will be analysed and challenged at this symposium. It will explore the possibilities of writing from images, writing with images, writing to images and writing against images. The beaten paths of these long and often debated relationships in academic writing will be taken off track to see if the clichés that surround these interactions in academia can be torn apart and reworked into more productive dynamic exchanges.

Thirdly, the potential of such practices to create a presence in social medias with a view to professional purposes, or how blogging, and indeed tweeting, can link the students to communities and prospective avenues beyond the university, will be scrutinised.  Students have been encouraged to think about their online presences in a number of ways. As a digital note book/sketchbook where ideas can be drafted, edited, reworked and published. It also made the students think about who they were writing for in a professional context.

Fourthly, the articulation of the place, and merit of such practices within the wider design curriculum will be discussed. This will be in relation to employers wanting to see, not only a finished portfolio website that is demanded by the profession and academia, but a blog type site that also show the thinking, mistakes and the processes through to the making of final works.

Programme

10.00      Coffee

10.30      Introduction to the day, Mark Ingham

11am       Writing as a creative activity for BA design (workshop,) Andrea Mason and Andrew Slatter

12.00      The pedagogy of creative writing – in the context of design  (talk), Andrea Mason

12.30       Graphic design and writing, Andrew Slatter

1pm         Lunch (Supplied by LCC)

1.45         “eRTFs” (Enriched Text Formats) Online, continuous and present writing in Art and Design Contextual & Theoretical lessons, Mark                       Ingham

2.30         The Myth of Creativity: How ‘creative writing’ in arts and design courses fails as effective/affective to, Linda Stupart

3pm        Tea break

3.30         Screens and writes: what kinds of intelligences? Harriet Edwards

4-5           Discussion and exchange in small group; final feedback

 

We have some space for participants outside LCC itself to write-up their own practice OR responses to the day, with images or as a visual essay for Writing PAD’s Journal of Writing in Creative Practice (Intellect).

Free but please book

Attendance is free of charge with preference being given to staff in HE institutions and FE colleges across the UK. Places will be allocated on a first come, first served basis. Lunch and refreshments will be provided, but travel expenses will not be covered. However, the HEA is currently running a funding scheme to support travel crossing national borders to attend events, which could be applied for independently. For more information visit the HEA UK Travel Fund.

We have 32 places available on this day.

To book a place, please email:

Dr Harriet Edwards

h.edwards@csm.arts.ac.uk

(Journal Editor)

Or: Dr Mark Ingham

m.ingham@lcc.arts.ac.uk

Too Much

UAL      Writing PAD        HEA

,LCC Photography Research Show

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This research hub based at London College of Communication (LCC) brings together practitioners and theorists to explore and promote photography as a mode of imaginary thought and its relation to a collective imaginary.

Specifically, we are interested in the increasingly complex research methodologies that underpin fine art photography as a form of knowledge with its own epistemology. Particular emphasis will be given to photographic works that explicitly engage with contemporary thought; theories that engage with contemporary photography; as well as photographic images and philosophies of the image that contribute to how the imaginary is invested in photographic production and the ‘as if’ condition of the photographic image.

The Photography and the Contemporary Imaginary Research Hub builds on LCC’s international reputation for conceptual photography and is organized by Dr Wiebke Leister and Paul Tebbs.

Events

The Photography and the Contemporary Imaginary Research Hub is pleased to announce the second LCC Photography Research Show

Private View: Thursday 27 March 2014, 18.00-20.00 Nursery Gallery, London College of Communication, Elephant & Castle

Jananne Al-Ani . Beverley Carruthers . Robin Silas Christian . Edward Dimsdale . Matthew Hawkins . Claire Hooper . Tom Hunter . Mark Ingham . Melanie King . Wiebke Leister . Dallas Seitz . Sophy Rickett . Tansy Spinks . Monica Takvam . Esther Teichmann . Val Williams .

The Photography and the Contemporary Imaginary Research Hub builds on LCC’s international reputation for conceptual photography. This event is organized by Beverley Carruthers and Wiebke Leister and supported by UAL Communities of Practice funding.

In this section

 Talking and writing about design: it’s what this course is all about. Combining history and theory with business skills and applied practice, BA (Hons) Design Cultures will give you an understanding of design history, global cultures and ethics and sustainability. You’ll also explore how you can use design to create positive change.

The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things

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Cyberman with Gargoyle
Cyberman Helmet, 1985, Courtesy Chris Balcombe, Photo: Chris Balcombe
Singing Gargoyle, England, c. 1200, Courtesy of Sam Fogg, London

Curated by Mark Leckey

Turner Prize-winning artist Mark Leckey has curated an exhibition that explores the magical world of new technology, as well as tracing its connections to the beliefs of our distant past.

Historical and contemporary works of art, videos, machines, archaeological artefacts and iconic objects, like the giant inflatable cartoon figure of Felix the Cat – the first image ever transmitted on TV – inhabit an “enchanted landscape” created in the Pavilion’s galleries, where objects seem to be communicating with each other and with us.

In Leckey’s exhibition “magic is literally in the air.” It reflects on a world where technology can bring inanimate “things” to life. Where websites predict what we want, we can ask our mobile phones for directions and smart fridges suggest recipes, count calories and even switch on the oven. By digitising objects, it can also make them “disappear” from the material world, re-emerging in any place or era.

In this timeless exhibition, “the real and the virtual co-exist”, Leckey has said. Perhaps technology has created its own form of consciousness – an animistic future. While we already live in the realms of what used to be science fiction, we seem to have simultaneously gone back to our ancestral past – a time when ancient civilisations believed spirits inhabited plants, animals, geographic features and even objects.

Leckey’s theatre of “things” is presented in specially designed environments. Works by artists such as William Blake, Louise Bourgeois, Martin Creed, Richard Hamilton, Nicola Hicks, Jim Shaw and Tøyen are displayed alongside a medieval silver hand containing the bones of a saint, an electronic prosthetic hand that connects with Bluetooth, a bisected 3D model of Snoopy showing his internal organs, and many other treasures that all share connections. Loosely divided into four themes or scenes – the Vegetable World, Animal Kingdom, Mankind and the Technological Domain, Leckey’s exhibition is a collection of not-so-dumb things that all talk, literally or metaphorically, to each other.

Mark Leckey was born in Birkenhead in 1964. He currently teaches at Goldsmiths College, University of London. In 2008 he won the Turner Prize. Recent solo exhibitions include Work & Leisure at Manchester Art Gallery (2012), and See We Assemble at the Serpentine Gallery, London (2011). The Universal Addressability of Dumb Things is the latest in a series of artist-curated Hayward Touring exhibitions.

‘The status of objects’, Leckey argues, ‘is changing, and we are once again in thrall to an enchanted world full of transformations and correspondences, a wonderful instability between things animate and inanimate, animal and human, mental and material’. Our hyper-rationalism of modern technology has paradoxically produced its opposite, an ‘irrational’ magical realm – or as Marshall McLuhan, communication theorist, described “a resonating world akin to the old tribal echo chamber where magic will live again”.

A Hayward Touring exhibition from Southbank Centre, London

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Woofer Design by Sander Mulder
© Sander Mulder

De La Warr Pavilion
Marina
Bexhill On Sea
East Sussex
TN40 1DP
Box Office and information:
01424 229 111 or boxoffice@dlwp.com

Sat 13 Jul 2013-
Sun 20 Oct 2013
Tickets: Free entry

Booking & Information:
01424 229 111

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Speculations IV, June 2013, ISBN: 978-0615797861

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If philosophy begins in wonder, then where does it end? What is its end? Aristotle said that while it begins in wondrous questioning, it ends with “the better state” of attaining answers, like an itch we get rid of with a good scratch or a childhood disease that, once gotten over, never returns. How depressing! Why can’t a good question continue being questionable or, in a more literal translation of the German, “question-worthy?” As Heidegger puts it, “philosophical questions are in principle never settled as if some day one could set them aside.” Couldn’t we learn from questions without trying to settle them, resolve ourselves to not resolving them? Couldn’t wisdom be found in reconciling ourselves to its perpetual love, and never its possession? Wittgenstein once wrote that “a philosophical problem has the form: ‘I don’t know my way about,’” which was the symptom of the deep confusion that constituted philosophy for him. But Heidegger loved wandering aimlessly in the woods, following Holzwege or paths that lead nowhere, stumbling onto dead-ends which could also be clearings.

–Lee Braver, “On Not Settling the Issue of Realism”

Download Speculations IV as a PDF.

Purchase print edition HERE.

–TABLE OF CONTENTS–

Editorial Introduction

PART I: REFLECTIONS

On Not Settling the Issue of Realism
Lee Braver

Politics and Speculative Realism
Levi R. Bryant

The Current State of Speculative Realism
Graham Harman

Weird Reading
Eileen A. Joy

A Very Dangerous Supplement: Speculative Realism, Academic Blogging, and the Future of Philosophy
Adam Kotsko

Speculative Realism: Interim Report with Just a Few Caveats
Christopher Norris

The Future of an Illusion
Jon Roffe

Realism and Representation: On the Ontological Turn
Daniel Sacilotto

PART II: PROPOSALS

“The World is an Egg”: Realism, Mathematics, and the Thresholds of Difference
Jeffrey A. Bell

Ontological Commitments
Manuel DeLanda

The Meaning of “Existence” and the Contingency of Sense
Markus Gabriel

Post-Deconstructive Realism: It’s About Time
Peter Gratton

Points of Forced Freedom: Eleven (More) Theses on Materialism
Adrian Johnston

Realism and the Infinite
Paul M. Livingston

How to Behave Like a Non-Philosopher, or, Speculative Versus Revisionary Metaphysics
John Mullarkey

“The Horror of Darkness”: Toward an Unhuman Phenomenology
Dylan Trigg

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The Unknown Fields Division is a nomadic design studio that ventures out on annual expeditions to the ends of the earth exploring unreal and forgotten landscapes, alien terrains and obsolete ecologies. Join the Division as each year we navigate a different global cross section and map the complex and contradictory realities of the present as a site of strange and extraordinary futures.

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Here we are both visionaries and reporters, part documentarians and part science fiction soothsayers as the otherworldly sites we encounter afford us a distanced viewpoint from which to survey the consequences of emerging environmental and technological scenarios.

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Liam Young

Liam Young currently lives and works in London as an independent designer, futurist, critic and curator.

Liam was recently named by Blueprint magazine as one of 25 people who will change architecture and design in 2010. He is a founder of the think tank Tomorrows Thoughts Today, a group whose work explores the consequences of fantastic, perverse and underrated urbanisms and teaches award winning design studios around the world.

His projects deploy fictional near-future scenarios as critical instruments for instigating debate about the social, architectural and political consequences of emerging biological and technological futures.

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Kate Davies

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Kate Davies is a designer, writer and educator, she is a co-founder of the multidisciplinary group LiquidFactory, which explores the rich hinterlands of art, architecture and performance. Kate has taught at London Metropolitan University and Chelsea College of Art and run various design workshops in Sweden, Spain, Belgium and Korea. She graduated from the Bartlett School of Architecture, London and has worked for a number of architectural practices in the UK and Europe.

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